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Life gets better with less sugars

11 Apr 2016

 

At the recent Digital Health Show in Sydney (first weekend of April), I sat in on a food demo session conducted by Michele Chevalley Hedge (nutritionist with her business ahealthyview.com), promoting her 28-day low sugar lifestyle program and recent publication of the Dummies Guide to Beating Sugar Addiction. If you want to help yourself and your family be healthier for the long term, have a look at these options and just get on with it. Or be inspired by Sarah Wilson’s “I Quit Sugar” recipes or motivated by David Gillespie’s “Sweet Poison”, whatever the criticism (http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/media-releases/response-david-gillespie-behalf-nut-net) or look for similar resources developed in your own country.

 

There’s really no debate anymore about how dis-eased we are as a society raised on the high sugars/refined carbohydrate content of processed foods without enough fresh, nutrient dense, vegetables and whole fruit to provide essential minerals and vitamins or enough healthy fats for functionally healthy cell membranes. If you take the time to read this lengthy, but very readable article, you’ll appreciate how and why we’ve been so ill-advised for a long time:

 

 

If you’re addicted to sweetness and/or to convenience food, and feel too time poor to prepare freshly made meals, quitting sugars can be very challenging.  But more and more people are doing it, and are improving their blood sugar control; improving mood, behavior and other mental distress; regenerating their liver; balancing their hormones; reversing their trend towards diabetes; reducing arthritic pain; normalising their thyroid function; helping cancerous tumors regress; improving their immunity…and life gets better! As the quote goes: “Nothing tastes as good as healthy feels“.

 

And food tastes better and food preparation is more enjoyable when you can share it with others. So my old-fashioned preference is to work with small groups of people face-to-face (rather than electronically), for the benefits and cost-effectiveness of group dynamics, and to bring people together to eat delicious real food and to have interesting conversations, without intrusion of e-devices.

 

If this appeals to you, I’d love to hear from you to help me in planning group health programmes and community dinners.

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